Including Primary Care in Health Insurance Policy Coverage with Insurance Is Reasonable

The missing part 5 of Brekke’s “Paying for Primary Care”, a comment. Under the traditional insurance model, patients receiving covered primary will indirectly pay significant administrative costs, but they may also gain compensating financial advantages that Gayle Brekke’s multipart “Paying for Primary Care” series fails to recognize, ignores, or minimizes. At the top of theContinue reading “Including Primary Care in Health Insurance Policy Coverage with Insurance Is Reasonable”

Brekke’s “Paying for Primary Care”, Comment on Part 4

In the first three installments of her Paying for Primary Care series, actuary Gayle Brekke’s invoked actuarial principles and behavioral economics to scold coverage of primary care on the ground that the costs of primary care are “predictable, routine, likely events over which the customer has a great deal of control”. In her fourth installment,Continue reading “Brekke’s “Paying for Primary Care”, Comment on Part 4″

Brekke’s “Paying for Primary Care”, Comment on Part 3

In Part 3 of Paying for Primary Care, Gayle Brekke discourses on the behavioral economics of shared health cost arrangements to conclude that insuring primary care adds costs not seen in direct pay. These cost, she contends, simply add on to the 50% administrative cost burden of insurance she had already she had already declaredContinue reading “Brekke’s “Paying for Primary Care”, Comment on Part 3″

Brekke’s “Paying for Primary Care”, Comment on Part 2

In Part 1 of “Paying for Primary Care”, actuary Gayle Brekke (mis)computed the provider side administrative cost burden of paying for primary care insurance at about 28%; in a response, I showed it likely that the true number was less than 9%, indicting that Brekke had inflated by more than three fold. Now we turnContinue reading “Brekke’s “Paying for Primary Care”, Comment on Part 2″

Brekke’s “Paying for Primary Care”, Comment on Part 1

In the winter of 2021, actuary Gayle Brekke penned a four–part–blogpost–series arguing that the cost of insurance primary care delivery in the insurance system is at least 50% higher the cost of delivering primary care through subscription model DPC. Notably, Brekke’s work was theoretical rather than empirical; she attempted to compute the relative costs ofContinue reading “Brekke’s “Paying for Primary Care”, Comment on Part 1″