Paying for Primary Care with Insurance Makes Considerable Sense

The missing part 5 of Brekke’s “Paying for Primary Care”, a comment. Under the traditional insurance model, patients may incur some administrative costs but also gain financial advantages that Gayle Brekke’s multipart “Paying for Primary Care” series fails to recognize, ignores, or minimizes. At the top of the list, insurers bring the combined strength ofContinue reading “Paying for Primary Care with Insurance Makes Considerable Sense”

Brekke’s “Paying for Primary Care”, Comment on Part 4

In the first three installments of her Paying for Primary Care series, actuary Gayle Brekke’s invoked actuarial principles and behavioral economics to scold coverage of primary care on the ground that the costs of primary care are “predictable, routine, likely events over which the customer has a great deal of control”. In her fourth installment,Continue reading “Brekke’s “Paying for Primary Care”, Comment on Part 4″

Brekke’s “Paying for Primary Care”, Comment on Part 3

In Part 3 of Paying for Primary Care, Gayle Brekke discourses on the behavioral economics of shared health cost arrangements to conclude that insuring primary care adds costs not seen in direct pay. These cost, she contends, simply add on to the 50% administrative cost burden of insurance she had already she had already declaredContinue reading “Brekke’s “Paying for Primary Care”, Comment on Part 3″

Brekke’s “Paying for Primary Care”, Comment on Part 2

In Part 1 of “Paying for Primary Care”, actuary Gayle Brekke (mis)computed the provider side administrative cost burden of paying for primary care insurance at about 28%; in a response, I showed it likely that the true number was less than 9%, indicting that Brekke had inflated by more than three fold. Now we turnContinue reading “Brekke’s “Paying for Primary Care”, Comment on Part 2″

Brekke’s “Paying for Primary Care”, Comment on Part 1

Health Care Cost Institute data presenting the 2017 primary care costs of millions of insureds shows an average annual primary care spend for 25-50 year olds of just less than $450. For the same period, the cost of a direct primary care for same-aged subscribers was $900. Although you might consider direct primary care forContinue reading “Brekke’s “Paying for Primary Care”, Comment on Part 1″