Brekke’s “Paying for Primary Care”, Comment on Part 3

In Part 3 of Paying for Primary Care, Gail Brekke discourses on the distribution of benefit and burden in shared health cost arrangements to conclude that insuring primary care adds costs not seen in direct pay. These cost, she contends, simply add on to the 50% administrative cost burden of insurance she had already sheContinue reading “Brekke’s “Paying for Primary Care”, Comment on Part 3″

Brekke’s “Paying for Primary Care”, Comment on Part 2

Is there a single D-PCP who has not told hundreds of patients that over seventy percent of them will not reach their deductible in any given year? In Part 1 of “Paying for Primary Care”, actuary Gail Brekke (mis)computed the provider side administrative cost burden of paying insurance at about 28%; in a response, IContinue reading “Brekke’s “Paying for Primary Care”, Comment on Part 2″

Brekke’s “Paying for Primary Care”, Comment on Part 1

Health Care Cost Institute data presenting the 2017 primary care costs of millions of insureds shows an average annual primary care spend for 25-50 year olds of just less than $450.. For the same period, the cost of a direct primary care for same-aged subscribers was $900. Although you might consider direct primary care forContinue reading “Brekke’s “Paying for Primary Care”, Comment on Part 1″

New DPC leader is incredible – unfortunately, not in the good way.

Let’s meet Cladogh Ryan MD, one of the new board members for DPC Alliance for 2021 who picked up the torch from some of those golden oldies. Dr Ryan cranked up a town meeting style event to recruit some of her Cook County, IL, fee-for-service patients into her new enterprise, Cara Direct Care. She layedContinue reading “New DPC leader is incredible – unfortunately, not in the good way.”

Nextera and Paladina: a race to the top of Mount Brag

In 2015, Qliance still towered over all in the world of Direct Primary Care bragging with its claim of 20% overall cost reductions. Even that, of course, was quite a come down from the extravagant claims previously spewed under the Qliance banner; fond memories still linger of those heady days when the Heritage Foundation drooledContinue reading “Nextera and Paladina: a race to the top of Mount Brag”

Shorter KPI Ninja/Nextera SVVSD report

“We used a statistically valid risk measurement tool and determined that there was a a non-Nextera population had a 7.5% difference greater level of risk then our Nextera population. But don’t believe that result, because it was not statistically valid.” “We reduced inpatient hospital 92.7%. Want to know how great we are? Our statistically validContinue reading “Shorter KPI Ninja/Nextera SVVSD report”

KPI Ninja/Nextera report: every single cost comparison has a 10% benefit design error.

In KPI Ninja’s “School District Claims Analysis” comparing claims costs under the Nextera plan and the competing fee for service (Choice) plan, the “Analyst” overlooked two major differences between the plans in how the “School District” pays “Claims“.   Nextera members pay post-deductible coinsurance at a 20% rate and the district pays an 80% share. ButContinue reading “KPI Ninja/Nextera report: every single cost comparison has a 10% benefit design error.”

KPI Ninja’s Nextera risk measurement charade

Abstract: The Nextera “study” by KPI Ninja misappropriated the prestige of a Johns Hopkins research team to support its risk measurement claims; relied on an undisclosed and unvalidated methodology for obtaining population risk measurements; obtained highly dubious risk measurement results; and sharply mischaracterized the significance of those results. In the end, because applying even theirContinue reading “KPI Ninja’s Nextera risk measurement charade”

KPI Ninja’s Nextera analysis: more than enough problems.

Three major adjustments are needed, even without correcting the IP admit rate problem or arriving at a more reasonable risk adjustment. Comparing data from Nextera patients and non-Nextera patients in the SVVSD programs requires three major adjustments which KPI Ninja never attempted. Computations here. Because of the different benefit structures, the district’s claim costs forContinue reading “KPI Ninja’s Nextera analysis: more than enough problems.”