Nextera: the KPI Ninja study in a nutshell.

The KPI Ninja report ignored the effect of an HRA for non-Nextera members only. But $750 in first dollar coverage gets a cost-conscious non-Nextera employee a lot of cost-barrier free primary care for her chronic condition. And, unlike the dollars the SVVSD spends at Nextera, every HRA dollar the district covers for a non-Nextera employeeContinue reading “Nextera: the KPI Ninja study in a nutshell.”

KPI Ninja’s Nextera analysis: too many flaws to address them all.

Candor matters. Even as a cloud of tainted IP admission data looms over KPI Ninja’s analysis of Nextera’s SVVSD clinic, underneath that report there may well lie a pants-fire of misappropriated prestige. “KPI Ninja conducted risk score analysis in partnership with Johns Hopkins’ ACG® research team [.]” KPI Ninja Nextera study, versions of 10.13.20 andContinue reading “KPI Ninja’s Nextera analysis: too many flaws to address them all.”

Nextera says these average people have an IP admit rate of 246/1k.

In their path-breaking report on Direct Primary Care to the Society of Actuaries, the team from Milliman Actuaries described a model framework for an employer direct primary option. They concluded that DPC was a break-even monetary propositions when DPC monthly fees were set at an average of $60 PMPM, $720 PMPM. That modeling was basedContinue reading “Nextera says these average people have an IP admit rate of 246/1k.”

DPC cherry-picking: the defense speaks. Part 2.

Update: In the fall of 2020, KPI Ninja released the first study that relies on it’s new risk information technology. I find it sadly opaque. Recap of Part 1 The direct primary care community has long tried to support claims that DPC reduces overall health care costs by 20% to 40% with non-risk-adjusted cost-reduction dataContinue reading “DPC cherry-picking: the defense speaks. Part 2.”

DPC cherry-picking: the defense speaks. Part 1.

Jump to Part 2. Within days of the Milliman report warning of the “imperative to control for patient selection in DPC studies [lest] differences in cost due to underlying patient differences [] be erroneously assigned as differences caused by DPC”, the first rumbling of resistance from the DPC advocacy community emerged. This was a suggestion,Continue reading “DPC cherry-picking: the defense speaks. Part 1.”

Epiphany. Dr Gross’s risk adjustment metholodogy for direct primary care stands contrary to contemporary understandings of how to assess the relative expected costs of differing populations.

Dr. Lee Gross’s Epiphany Healthcare provides DPC services for some of the employees and some members of of some of their families at a hospital in Florida. Some hospital employees decline Epiphany; they and some members of their families receive instead traditional insurance based primary care. Unusually for such arrangements, a recent assessment of theContinue reading “Epiphany. Dr Gross’s risk adjustment metholodogy for direct primary care stands contrary to contemporary understandings of how to assess the relative expected costs of differing populations.”

The mixed bag of Milliman earns a final grade: B

Skillful actuarial work on risk adjustment. A clear warning against relying on studies that ignored risk adjustment. Implicit repudiation of a decade of unfounded brags. An admirable idea on “isolating the impact of DPC model” from the bad decisions of a studied employer. But then, a failure to realize an important prerequisite for performing thatContinue reading “The mixed bag of Milliman earns a final grade: B”

Attn: AEG/WP. Milliman study implies 12.6% downstream care cost reductions for DPC.

The AEG/WP plan still isn’t likely to work. A $95 PMPM fee, increasing at the same rate as other medical expenses, and coupled to a 12.6% reduction down stream would evaporate all of AEG/WP’s claimed billion savings. “Healthcare Innovations in Georgia:Two Recommendations”, the report prepared by the Anderson Economic Group and Wilson Partners (AEG/WP) forContinue reading “Attn: AEG/WP. Milliman study implies 12.6% downstream care cost reductions for DPC.”

Risk adjustment, and more, badly needed for KPI Ninja’s Strada-brag

Amended 6/26/20 3:15AM The Milliman report’s insistence on the important of risk adjustment will no doubt see the DPC movement pouring a lot of their old wine into new bottles, and perhaps even the creation of new wine. In the meantime, the old gang has been demanding attention to some of the old wine stillContinue reading “Risk adjustment, and more, badly needed for KPI Ninja’s Strada-brag”

A moment of clarity about selection bias – at a DPC summit.

At 2019 Summit, Mike Tuggy, MD, FAAFP, presented this: What Have Primary Care Practices Provided to Employers Who Invested in Primary Care? The Results Speak for Themselves–Reports from Across the U.S.2019 DPCSummit62019 Direct Primary Care (DPC) Summit His presentation began with high praise for Qliance and others. He suggested that these models might be usedContinue reading “A moment of clarity about selection bias – at a DPC summit.”