DPC and Medicaid expansion politics.

DPC docs uniformly recommend that their non-indigent patients have wrap-around insurance coverage. But for indigents, particularly for what are known as “Medicaid expansion adults” too many DPC docs are willing to push their state for an indigents’ program heavy on direct primary care coupled to, at best, skimpy coverage of downstream costs. They’re eager forContinue reading “DPC and Medicaid expansion politics.”

DPC + Cat is not a good substitute for full ACA Medicaid expansion

When Brain Forrest MD, the founder of the Access Healthcare direct primary care clinic, does legislative advocacy at, for example, the United States Senate, he shows the data of the foregoing chart. It’s from a 2013 course project by three NC State post-baccalaureate management students. He advocates pro-DPC legislation, apparently telling policy makers that theContinue reading “DPC + Cat is not a good substitute for full ACA Medicaid expansion”

Three bad ways to bet the health of Georgia citizens on direct primary care.

Every published claim that direct primary care makes a significant dent in necessary health care spending is dubious at best. See, for example, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here and here. When the data from the Union County clinic — a Georgia Public Policy Foundation favorite — is age-adjusted, it indicatesContinue reading “Three bad ways to bet the health of Georgia citizens on direct primary care.”

Origins and future of the report "Healthcare Innovations in Georgia"

The Medicaid goal of the political right in Georgia has always been careful stewardship of tax-payer funds. Three years ago, the Georgia Public Policy Foundation began to flog a bargain basement Medicaid waiver plan priced at $2500 per capita. The core rationale for this seemingly meager amount was that $60-$70 a month direct primary careContinue reading “Origins and future of the report "Healthcare Innovations in Georgia"”

Monthly direct primary care fees will not hold steady at $70 for a decade.

That alone makes the AEG/WP report off by about $500,000,000. In “Healthcare Innovations in Georgia:Two Recommendations”, the report prepared by the Anderson Economic Group and Wilson Partners (AEG/WP) for the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, the authors clearly explained their computations and made clear the assumptions underlying their report. One of the assumptions was that theContinue reading “Monthly direct primary care fees will not hold steady at $70 for a decade.”

$70 lowballs the monthly direct primary care fee.

On that score alone, the AEG/WP report is off by $750,000,000. In “Healthcare Innovations in Georgia:Two Recommendations”, the report prepared by the Anderson Economic Group and Wilson Partners (AEG/WP) for the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, the authors clearly explained their computations and made clear the assumptions underlying their report. One of the assumptions was thatContinue reading “$70 lowballs the monthly direct primary care fee.”

Good for you, GPPF!

AEG/WP accurately reported that health coverage costs real money. Annual premiums are: $8,829 in the individual market $6,668 in the small group market $5,845 in the large group market. In the lowest priced large group, members of the vast majority of plans also are subject to at least some cost sharing (deductibles, copayments, and/or coinsurance).Continue reading “Good for you, GPPF!”