$70 lowballs the monthly direct primary care fee.

On that score alone, the AEG/WP report is off by $750,000,000. In “Healthcare Innovations in Georgia:Two Recommendations”, the report prepared by the Anderson Economic Group and Wilson Partners (AEG/WP) for the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, the authors clearly explained their computations and made clear the assumptions underlying their report. One of the assumptions was thatContinue reading “$70 lowballs the monthly direct primary care fee.”

Good for you, GPPF!

AEG/WP accurately reported that health coverage costs real money. Annual premiums are: $8,829 in the individual market $6,668 in the small group market $5,845 in the large group market. In the lowest priced large group, members of the vast majority of plans also are subject to at least some cost sharing (deductibles, copayments, and/or coinsurance).Continue reading “Good for you, GPPF!”

Automobiles are fast and affordable: a parable.

Automobiles are fast. Only a few days after finalization of the AEG/WP report in May of 2019, in a city in the Midwest Region of the United States, data was collected for a study of automobile performance. In this study, researchers operated 39 different automobiles for a distance of ten miles one or more times,Continue reading “Automobiles are fast and affordable: a parable.”

Mischievous Foundations?

Early in 2017, I became aware of a policy initiative by the Georgia Public Policy Foundation the gist of which was to expand Medicaid in Georgia to more beneficiaries while, simultaneously, reducing the total per person expenditure on Medicaid to $2500 per annum. The Foundation’s plan also purported to eliminate the burden of uncompensated careContinue reading “Mischievous Foundations?”

The gym club model. For healthcare?

Addressing those new to the idea, direct primary care partisans often start to explain the model by comparing it to membership in a fitness club with nearly unlimited access for a fixed monthly fee. I’m puzzled. Gym clubs are subject to high member churn rates. Is this wise for health care? High churn owes inContinue reading “The gym club model. For healthcare?”

Did direct primary care save Union County $1,280,000? Don’t bet on it. [Updated 1/6/18. Re-updated 1/13/20]

See 2020 update below. A 4+ – year age gap between two health care enrollee pools explains a lot. DPC advocates find their poster child. A group of self-declared “fighters for health care freedom”, such as North Carolina’s John Locke Foundation and its Director of Health Policy, Katherine Restrepo, have been heavily promoting a healthContinue reading “Did direct primary care save Union County $1,280,000? Don’t bet on it. [Updated 1/6/18. Re-updated 1/13/20]”

Direct Primary Care is not a magic bullet that will bring adequate health care to low income Georgia citizens. (Revised.)

Anticipating January’s complete Republican control of the federal government and a new legislative session in similarly red Georgia, Tom Price’s go-to Atlanta columnist, Kyle Wingfield, launched a call, with support and direction from their favorite Georgia think tank, the Georgia Public Policy Foundation, for a version of Medicaid expansion which may well also indicate theContinue reading “Direct Primary Care is not a magic bullet that will bring adequate health care to low income Georgia citizens. (Revised.)”

Donald Trump’s Medical Delusions

Link below is to Krugman column of 1/13/2017. PK might be off just a little bit in saying that Republicans plans are “ALL about less”, and more skin in the game. Watch for Republicans to take just enough skin OUT of the game to put a patina of broad (if shallow), first-dollar coverage on theirContinue reading “Donald Trump’s Medical Delusions”