dpcreferee’s 2017 op-ed on Union County’s failure to save with DPC proved to be almost spot on.

In February 2017, I sent the op-ed piece below to the Charlotte Observer. It was not selected for publication. But it has been proven accurate in a detailed, independent study by team of health care actuaries from a firm of highly regarded actuaries known widely for its health care work. The study was prepared forContinue reading “dpcreferee’s 2017 op-ed on Union County’s failure to save with DPC proved to be almost spot on.”

Going insurance-free does not, and cannot, reduce the overhead expenses of primary care practices by 60%, or even 40%.

Substantial correction made on 2/12/2-13. About 13% of revenue (22% of overhead) according to academic research.  I’ve back-tracked Katherine Restrepo’s and Julie Tisdale’s 2016 claim that: By dealing directly with patients and filing no insurance billing whatsoever, DPC practices are able to eliminate 40-60 percent of their overhead expenses. A footnote there takes you to a 2015Continue reading “Going insurance-free does not, and cannot, reduce the overhead expenses of primary care practices by 60%, or even 40%.”

The only academic journal studies on point failed to show the efficacy of direct primary care.

Georgia’s conservative fans of direct primary care swoon over PHS, a 1500 member, insurance-free, hospital-based, direct primary care clinic in Altoona, Pennsylvania. PHS was the subject of not just one, but two quantitatively detailed academic journal articles addressing the efficacy of direct primary care. Since the oft-cited British Medical Journal study on the efficiency of direct primaryContinue reading “The only academic journal studies on point failed to show the efficacy of direct primary care.”